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Doug Tilden

Doug is an independent researcher with a lifelong passion for archaeology. Doug is a former two term trustee of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA). Doug also is active within the museum community in San Francisco supporting educational outreach around key exhibits. Doug was part of the team that pioneered, with assistance from the AIA, a new format for school visits including opening museums on Mondays solely for school groups and providing schools with both pre and post visit activities. This format was instituted with the King Tut exhibit at the Fine Arts Museum in 2009 and continues through the 2016 National Palace Museum exhibit at the Asia Art Museum.

Doug’s archaeology field work started in Egypt with excavations at the mortuary site of the 18th Dynasty Pharaoh, Ahmose, at Abydos. While retaining a strong interest in Egypt, Doug started work in Belize with American Foreign Academic Research in conjunction with BVAR in 2011. Since 2012 Doug has worked every season in Belize with BVAR. After four years working on the Eastern Triadic Shrine at Cahal Pech, Doug has worked the last two seasons at Xuanantunich. In addition to excavation Doug’s major interest is in conservation. The conservation of the Eastern Triadic Shrine at Cahal Pech and structure A3 at Xunantunich have been the highlights of his six years in Belize. “The Belize Institute of Archaeology conservators do a fabulous job bringing these structures back to life” says Doug.

Doug’s working career was in ocean transportation where he continues to serve as an industry consultant. His career gave him the opportunity to live on three continents and the Pacific islands and to travel to over 70 countries. Doug has a strong interest in how societies are organized and the impact of religion on society. His travels have allowed him to explore these subjects in depth and to visit many of the world’s archaeological sites.

Doug feels privileged to be part of the BVAR team and to work on projects that are important to our understanding of the Maya.